September 4, 2013
Beware of White Welkers #broncos

Beware of White Welkers #broncos

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December 21, 2012
TOP 10 ALBUMS OF 2012 (Listen on Spotify)
10. Divine Fits – Divine FitsThe concept of a supergroup has been distilled to tasteless dribble as of late—but the combination of Spoon’s Britt Daniel and Wolf Parade’s Dan Boeckner is most deserving of such a title. Divine Fits combines the best elements of both aforementioned outfits in a tightly-crafted effort that’s maturely concise and exploratory in nature.
9. Wild Nothing – NocturneThe market for shimmery lo-fi pop rock is nothing short of saturated at the moment, but no one manages to make such a familiar sound feel so distinct as Wild Nothing. The same driving melodies that made Gemini great are present on Nocturne—but a graduation to expanded instrumentalism and a range of production risks elevate this record to places its predecessor simply didn’t venture.
8. Lambchop – Mr. MLikely to be heard in a West Texas saloon on “Rat Pack Night,” Lambchop’s 11th effort, Mr. M, is the biggest anomaly on this list…but it’s also one of the more likeable albums included. Here, we find Kurt Wagner warbling about Millennial issues like taking pictures with camera phones juxtaposed with issues of a more personal nature—and somehow it all seems to compile quite nicely.
7. Mount Eerie – Clear MoonClear Moon and its counterpart, Ocean Roar, offer up a kind of foggy, faraway sound that instantly places the listener in a place that’s both refreshingly singular and depressingly solitary. Conjuring up plenty of comparisons to Mark Kozelek’s Sun Kil Moon project, the acoustic guitar jangling paired with airy percussion and foley noise is at once calming and nerve-wracking.
6. Tame Impala – LonerismNo outfit did more with what’s already been done in 2012 than Tame Impala. Their second album, Lonerism, is a superb homage to 1960s psychedelica, humming with guitar fuzz and synth whizz like a lost collection of Beatles sessions recorded in India. The whole thing warps and washes its way through, making for very fitting accompaniment during the hazier moments of your day.
5. Tanlines – Mixed EmotionsExpanding and improving on the calypso-tronic efforts of 2010’s Settings EP, Tanlines has created some of the most entertaining music of the year on Mixed Emotions. Pulsing with tropically-influenced synths and lazy vocals, it’s not a chore imagining this album’s 11 tracks smoothly emitted over the scene at a rooftop LA pool party…which, I’m sure, happened about six thousand times last summer.
4. Japandroids – Celebration RockRaucously fun and lyrically bombastic, the Japandroids’ sophomore effort clangs as loud as the best house party you’ve been to and leaves you with an equally deserved hangover. While it will only ever feel right to chant along to the nine tracks on Celebration Rock with arms draped around close friends, it’s not unlikely that this Canadian duo will be making rounds with some of rock’s great rebels, in front of khaki-wearing corporate types, for the duration of 2013.
3. Frank Ocean – channel ORANGEBetwixt all the trendy drama surrounding Frank Ocean’s sexual orientation is the kind of artist that R&B has sorely missed for a more than a decade. Not since D’Angelo or Aaliyah has one singer from the genre been so universally praised, and with good reason. channel ORANGE is an assured masterpiece of modern love and lust…a hipster portrait of adolescence without any of the clichéd hipster hangups.
2. Twin Shadow – ConfessLike the soundtrack to some unproduced Lost Boys sequel, Confess is the kind of John Hughes-on-coke schlock that could only feel right if done right. Thankfully, George Lewis Jr. is the right man for the job. Clad in a leather jacket, riding a Triumph, Lewis champions the post-pop slickness of Confess in ways his contemporaries can’t.
1. Father John Misty – Fear FunIt’s not like J. Tillman is the first guy to adopt the Laurel Canyon sound for this second decade of the new millennium, but he might be the most strung out. Unlike artists like Dawes who can’t seem to escape the jaded confusion of middle-20s life, on Fear Fun, Tillman is confident in his drug-addled existence, painting bizarre stories of ayahuasca binges and seedy men of the Hollywood underground. Though largely schizophrenic, this record is a triumph from start to finish—and it’s likely we haven’t quite seen the last of Father John Misty, the Dodgers fan and the ladies’ man.
Honorable Mentions
Chromatics - Kill for LoveDirty Projectors – Swing Lo MagellanPatrick Watson – Adventures in Your Own BackyardNiki & The Dove – InstinctBeach House – BloomSigur Ros – ValtariYellow Ostrich – Strange LandMac Demarco – Cooking Up Something GoodThe Helio Sequence – NegotiationsBat For Lashes – The Haunted ManJens Lekman – I Know What Love Isn’tCarly Rae Jepsen – KissPassion Pit – GossamerThe Killers – Battle BornKendrick Lamar – good kid, m.A.A.d citySun Kil Moon – Among the LeavesSt. Lucia – St. LuciaExitmusic – PassagePerfume Genius – Put Your Back N 2 ItBloc Party – FourNick Waterhouse – Time’s All GonePurity Ring – ShrinesDan Deacon – AmericaLost Lander – DRRTBear In Heaven – I Love You, It’s CoolDiiv – OshinKishi Bashi – 151aThe Men – Open Your Heart

TOP 10 ALBUMS OF 2012 (Listen on Spotify)

10. Divine Fits – Divine Fits
The concept of a supergroup has been distilled to tasteless dribble as of late—but the combination of Spoon’s Britt Daniel and Wolf Parade’s Dan Boeckner is most deserving of such a title. Divine Fits combines the best elements of both aforementioned outfits in a tightly-crafted effort that’s maturely concise and exploratory in nature.

9. Wild Nothing – Nocturne
The market for shimmery lo-fi pop rock is nothing short of saturated at the moment, but no one manages to make such a familiar sound feel so distinct as Wild Nothing. The same driving melodies that made Gemini great are present on Nocturne—but a graduation to expanded instrumentalism and a range of production risks elevate this record to places its predecessor simply didn’t venture.

8. Lambchop – Mr. M
Likely to be heard in a West Texas saloon on “Rat Pack Night,” Lambchop’s 11th effort, Mr. M, is the biggest anomaly on this list…but it’s also one of the more likeable albums included. Here, we find Kurt Wagner warbling about Millennial issues like taking pictures with camera phones juxtaposed with issues of a more personal nature—and somehow it all seems to compile quite nicely.

7. Mount Eerie – Clear Moon
Clear Moon and its counterpart, Ocean Roar, offer up a kind of foggy, faraway sound that instantly places the listener in a place that’s both refreshingly singular and depressingly solitary. Conjuring up plenty of comparisons to Mark Kozelek’s Sun Kil Moon project, the acoustic guitar jangling paired with airy percussion and foley noise is at once calming and nerve-wracking.

6. Tame Impala – Lonerism
No outfit did more with what’s already been done in 2012 than Tame Impala. Their second album, Lonerism, is a superb homage to 1960s psychedelica, humming with guitar fuzz and synth whizz like a lost collection of Beatles sessions recorded in India. The whole thing warps and washes its way through, making for very fitting accompaniment during the hazier moments of your day.

5. Tanlines – Mixed Emotions
Expanding and improving on the calypso-tronic efforts of 2010’s Settings EP, Tanlines has created some of the most entertaining music of the year on Mixed Emotions. Pulsing with tropically-influenced synths and lazy vocals, it’s not a chore imagining this album’s 11 tracks smoothly emitted over the scene at a rooftop LA pool party…which, I’m sure, happened about six thousand times last summer.

4. Japandroids – Celebration Rock
Raucously fun and lyrically bombastic, the Japandroids’ sophomore effort clangs as loud as the best house party you’ve been to and leaves you with an equally deserved hangover. While it will only ever feel right to chant along to the nine tracks on Celebration Rock with arms draped around close friends, it’s not unlikely that this Canadian duo will be making rounds with some of rock’s great rebels, in front of khaki-wearing corporate types, for the duration of 2013.

3. Frank Ocean – channel ORANGE
Betwixt all the trendy drama surrounding Frank Ocean’s sexual orientation is the kind of artist that R&B has sorely missed for a more than a decade. Not since D’Angelo or Aaliyah has one singer from the genre been so universally praised, and with good reason. channel ORANGE is an assured masterpiece of modern love and lust…a hipster portrait of adolescence without any of the clichéd hipster hangups.

2. Twin Shadow – Confess
Like the soundtrack to some unproduced Lost Boys sequel, Confess is the kind of John Hughes-on-coke schlock that could only feel right if done right. Thankfully, George Lewis Jr. is the right man for the job. Clad in a leather jacket, riding a Triumph, Lewis champions the post-pop slickness of Confess in ways his contemporaries can’t.

1. Father John Misty – Fear Fun
It’s not like J. Tillman is the first guy to adopt the Laurel Canyon sound for this second decade of the new millennium, but he might be the most strung out. Unlike artists like Dawes who can’t seem to escape the jaded confusion of middle-20s life, on Fear Fun, Tillman is confident in his drug-addled existence, painting bizarre stories of ayahuasca binges and seedy men of the Hollywood underground. Though largely schizophrenic, this record is a triumph from start to finish—and it’s likely we haven’t quite seen the last of Father John Misty, the Dodgers fan and the ladies’ man.

Honorable Mentions

Chromatics - Kill for Love
Dirty Projectors – Swing Lo Magellan
Patrick Watson – Adventures in Your Own Backyard
Niki & The Dove – Instinct
Beach House – Bloom
Sigur Ros – Valtari
Yellow Ostrich – Strange Land
Mac Demarco – Cooking Up Something Good
The Helio Sequence – Negotiations
Bat For Lashes – The Haunted Man
Jens Lekman – I Know What Love Isn’t
Carly Rae Jepsen – Kiss
Passion Pit – Gossamer
The Killers – Battle Born
Kendrick Lamar – good kid, m.A.A.d city
Sun Kil Moon – Among the Leaves
St. Lucia – St. Lucia
Exitmusic – Passage
Perfume Genius – Put Your Back N 2 It
Bloc Party – Four
Nick Waterhouse – Time’s All Gone
Purity Ring – Shrines
Dan Deacon – America
Lost Lander – DRRT
Bear In Heaven – I Love You, It’s Cool
Diiv – Oshin
Kishi Bashi – 151a
The Men – Open Your Heart

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December 17, 2012
holloweyed took a picture of the little theological dichotomy in my bathroom.

holloweyed took a picture of the little theological dichotomy in my bathroom.

(Source: mattdraper)

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April 19, 2011

The Damnwells - Golden Days (Acoustic Demo)

Best band of the past decade right here.

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April 13, 2011
In case you didn’t know who to thank for that sweet, sweet brew you’re about to drink. #coldonecity

In case you didn’t know who to thank for that sweet, sweet brew you’re about to drink. #coldonecity

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March 30, 2011
It should be harder to be an artist. You shouldn’t just be able to put a song on YouTube and go on tour.

Miley Cyrus, on the overnight success of Rebecca Black.

[usmag.]

(Source: thedailywhat)

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March 21, 2011

At first I didn’t think I was going to be able to embed this, and so I thought: it’s 20 minutes, and if I send people away from this I’ll wait…but it’s not likely anyone will see this and actually come back to read what trivial things I have to say about it.

Thank goodness I figured out how to embed this. Now you have to read what trivial things I have to say about it.

For starters, it’s amazing that this woman is able to speak as quickly and as eloquently as she does. Given, she’s a spoken word poet and that’s the whole point of what she does, or her core competency, or what have you. But that’s beside point.

The beginning of the talk, the poem about her daughter, is the single most impressive thing I’ve ever heard in support of “the best way” to raise a child should I ever be lucky (or unlucky) enough to have one. The unwavering sureness of what she’s saying, the way she is so unfathomably ready to raise a child she doesn’t and may never have, is incomprehensible…but somehow, it resonates. It makes sense.

She goes on to talk about how she was inspired by things, such unimpressive things in the grand scale of things…people who told her that they heard and felt what she said and propelled her to keep saying more. How she somehow found a way to be heard, as a young person, and turned that into something more than just influence.

Then she goes on to talk (in that same unwavering and unbroken eloquence) about how she fosters young people to express themselves regardless of how interesting they find themselves to be because, in someone’s eyes, everyone is interesting. Even me…at least, to those of you who are still reading. (Thanks.)

She goes even further as to recite another poem about how as a child she understood very little about the world. How she understood so little but was unafraid to attempt to affect so much regardless of the outcome. It’s unsurprising that she has a sense of how she wants to raise her daughter if she ever has one.

I’ve never had a moment in my life where I felt so sure of something as she appears to feel during this talk. It’s almost as if nothing I’ve ever strived for or imagined to be true has ever been as important. It probably hasn’t. But what’s also true is that after hearing this I imagine that someday, something I strive for will be this important. Something I accomplish will be this powerful to me and to the people who see it, feel it. Something I do will affect someone this deeply and when it does, I’ll know it.

I’ll know it.

That will be my daughter. Whenever she comes around. 

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February 28, 2011

improve the system constantly.
learn new things quickly.
respect the people who make your job possible.
contribution is the key.
it’s us against the world.
we are a family.
have a point of view.
take risks.
make everyone love you. 

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February 22, 2011
This will be the last time I ever post a photo of Carmelo Anthony on this blog. (Probably.)It’s not for spite, it’s not for a lack of appreciation for what Melo has done for Denver over the past seven years. It’s a new lack of interest.Unfortunately for Denver, the bevy of pretty-good-but-not-star-quality players coming to the Nuggets in return for Melo will probably keep us in the hunt for a playoff berth. And if we get one, next year will be even worse. While the final culmination of this season’s most ridiculously drawn-out trade story isn’t nearly as heartbreaking for Nuggets fans as ‘The Decision’ was for those in Cleveland, it’s just as telling of the new way. Unless this summer’s collective bargaining agreement can promise players like LeBron and Carmelo won’t have the last word in where they go and for how much, teams like the Cavaliers, the Nuggets, the Minnesota Timberwolves—teams in markets with less than a few million fans—will never compete for titles again. Sure, it can be fun watching slices of the All-Star ballots go up against one another week in and week out throughout the regular season, but what of the smaller cities?I’m going to miss Melo and I wish him no ill will; I only wish that the whole idea of the game was 30-some teams battling it out, parity ruling the league and the probability of surprises still something we can count on. Instead, we’re looking at a likely six-team league beginning to solidify over the next few years. I’m in Denver and I don’t plan on leaving…which pretty much leaves me screwed.Now basketball’s just like baseball. 

This will be the last time I ever post a photo of Carmelo Anthony on this blog. (Probably.)

It’s not for spite, it’s not for a lack of appreciation for what Melo has done for Denver over the past seven years. It’s a new lack of interest.

Unfortunately for Denver, the bevy of pretty-good-but-not-star-quality players coming to the Nuggets in return for Melo will probably keep us in the hunt for a playoff berth. And if we get one, next year will be even worse. While the final culmination of this season’s most ridiculously drawn-out trade story isn’t nearly as heartbreaking for Nuggets fans as ‘The Decision’ was for those in Cleveland, it’s just as telling of the new way. Unless this summer’s collective bargaining agreement can promise players like LeBron and Carmelo won’t have the last word in where they go and for how much, teams like the Cavaliers, the Nuggets, the Minnesota Timberwolves—teams in markets with less than a few million fans—will never compete for titles again. Sure, it can be fun watching slices of the All-Star ballots go up against one another week in and week out throughout the regular season, but what of the smaller cities?

I’m going to miss Melo and I wish him no ill will; I only wish that the whole idea of the game was 30-some teams battling it out, parity ruling the league and the probability of surprises still something we can count on. Instead, we’re looking at a likely six-team league beginning to solidify over the next few years. I’m in Denver and I don’t plan on leaving…which pretty much leaves me screwed.

Now basketball’s just like baseball. 

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